Gordon Feld
Gordon Feld

My researcher is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) for two years to do a post doc in the lab. My research mainly studied the neurochemical signals that may translate this replay into plastic changes for improved memory storage. I am especially interested how dopamine modulates neuroplasticity during sleep. At UCL I plan to perform an fMRI-study to investigate how reward memories are represented after sleep vs. wakefulness.

Sophie Renaudineau
Sophie Renaudineau
Hector  Page
Hector Page

My research focuses on using computational modelling to explain how the brain processes space. As part of the Jeffery Lab, I am specifically interested in spatially-responsive cells such as Head Direction, Grid, and Place cells. I am a firm believer in the value of data-driven model formation, and model-driven data collection. As such, I work in close collaboration with experimenters within the Jeffery Lab, in order to build computational models which can help to explain their data in the context of what we already know about spatial processing, and to suggest future hypotheses for empirical testing. More broadly, I am interested in understanding the responses of single neurons within a systems-level context. I believe spatial processing, with well-defined single neuron responses, is an ideal field in which to attempt this.

Eva Zita Patai
Eva Zita Patai

I'm currently working on a project investigating the neutral correlates of navigation in humans,  using fMRI and MEG. I'm particularly interested in how the recency of memories for locations may influence navigation strategies and the interaction with the environment. 

Catherine Perrodin
Catherine Perrodin

Exchanging sounds is one of the main forms of social communication, for us humans as well as many other animals species. My research, supported by the Wellcome Trust, aims to find out how our brain enables us to communicate with each other. I investigate the neuronal encoding of acoustic communication signals in mice during natural social interactions, using an approach combining the ethological study of animal behaviour with recordings and manipulations of neuronal ensembles.

James Cooke
James Cooke

I’m interested in how information is stored and processed by populations of neurons, particularly in the auditory cortex and hippocampus.  Learning during development is thought to shape the structure of cortical networks in order to allow them to extract stable object representations from highly variable sensory input, although little is known regarding the dynamics of this process.  Similarly, learning throughout life is thought to result in the storage of episodic memories in these same networks.  My research is focused on characterising how such information is stored in these networks and the impact of such learning on sensory processing in the same networks.

 

Tomaso Muzzu
Tomaso Muzzu

Saleem Lab

Antoine Coutrot
Antoine Coutrot

I am at the interface of cognitive science, signal processing and computational modelling. I have recorded and mined large eye-tracking datasets to discover gaze patterns diagnosis of a given population of observers. I used Bayesian inference and multimodal signal processing to build models of visual and audio-visual attention. At the UCL Spatial Cognition Group, I will work on the Sea Hero Quest project, the first mass scale data collection through mobile technology (2.5m participants). This will help fight dementia by understanding more about how the brain navigates. 

Amalia Papanikolaou
Amalia Papanikolaou

I am a postdoctoral fellow funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; DFG) and based at the Department of Experimental Psychology. My research focuses on understanding how the brain adjusts to sensory experience.

The nervous system adapts to the environment over a wide range of timescales. This plasticity has been parcelled into distinct categories of study (i.e. adaptation, perceptual learning) each emphasising distinct timescales and phenomenology. My principle aim is to investigate how the visual system adapts to changes in the visual environment at multiple timescales and to understand whether distinct forms of plasticity are mediated by the same or different neuronal mechanisms.

Eleonore Duvelle
Eleonore Duvelle

Who would we be without our memories? Through learning and memorisation of relevant information, our brain learns to make predictions about the world and take (hopefully) appropriate decisions. Our specific experiences make each one of us unique individuals and orient our daily actions. My general aim as a researcher is to try and understand how declarative memories are stored in neural networks and how they are used to influence complex decisions. In particular, I study "place cells", hippocampal neurons thought to encode spatial memories. Recording the activity of these cells in rats performing complex navigation tasks (for example in our "hexamaze") should help us unravel the mechanisms of navigation in complex space and the processes through which memory influences future decisions. Using in vivo electrophysiology, my work as a post-doctoral researcher aims at better understanding some of the neural mechanisms underlying goal-directed navigation in complex environments. I am particularly interested in hippocampal "place cells" and how these neurons might contribute not only to spatial memory but also to flexible decision-making in rats.

Roddy Grieves
Roddy Grieves

I'm a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Behavioral Neuroscience, University College London. My current experiments involve recording neurons at the single cell level in the rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex while these animals freely explore complex environments. Our experiments seek to determine how the activity of these cells can represent 2D spatial locations and how these representations may extend into three dimensions.

Mai Morimoto
Mai Morimoto

Saleem Lab

Gordon Feld
Sophie Renaudineau
Hector  Page
Eva Zita Patai
Catherine Perrodin
James Cooke
Tomaso Muzzu
Antoine Coutrot
Amalia Papanikolaou
Eleonore Duvelle
Roddy Grieves
Mai Morimoto
Gordon Feld

My researcher is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) for two years to do a post doc in the lab. My research mainly studied the neurochemical signals that may translate this replay into plastic changes for improved memory storage. I am especially interested how dopamine modulates neuroplasticity during sleep. At UCL I plan to perform an fMRI-study to investigate how reward memories are represented after sleep vs. wakefulness.

Sophie Renaudineau
Hector Page

My research focuses on using computational modelling to explain how the brain processes space. As part of the Jeffery Lab, I am specifically interested in spatially-responsive cells such as Head Direction, Grid, and Place cells. I am a firm believer in the value of data-driven model formation, and model-driven data collection. As such, I work in close collaboration with experimenters within the Jeffery Lab, in order to build computational models which can help to explain their data in the context of what we already know about spatial processing, and to suggest future hypotheses for empirical testing. More broadly, I am interested in understanding the responses of single neurons within a systems-level context. I believe spatial processing, with well-defined single neuron responses, is an ideal field in which to attempt this.

Eva Zita Patai

I'm currently working on a project investigating the neutral correlates of navigation in humans,  using fMRI and MEG. I'm particularly interested in how the recency of memories for locations may influence navigation strategies and the interaction with the environment. 

Catherine Perrodin

Exchanging sounds is one of the main forms of social communication, for us humans as well as many other animals species. My research, supported by the Wellcome Trust, aims to find out how our brain enables us to communicate with each other. I investigate the neuronal encoding of acoustic communication signals in mice during natural social interactions, using an approach combining the ethological study of animal behaviour with recordings and manipulations of neuronal ensembles.

James Cooke

I’m interested in how information is stored and processed by populations of neurons, particularly in the auditory cortex and hippocampus.  Learning during development is thought to shape the structure of cortical networks in order to allow them to extract stable object representations from highly variable sensory input, although little is known regarding the dynamics of this process.  Similarly, learning throughout life is thought to result in the storage of episodic memories in these same networks.  My research is focused on characterising how such information is stored in these networks and the impact of such learning on sensory processing in the same networks.

 

Tomaso Muzzu

Saleem Lab

Antoine Coutrot

I am at the interface of cognitive science, signal processing and computational modelling. I have recorded and mined large eye-tracking datasets to discover gaze patterns diagnosis of a given population of observers. I used Bayesian inference and multimodal signal processing to build models of visual and audio-visual attention. At the UCL Spatial Cognition Group, I will work on the Sea Hero Quest project, the first mass scale data collection through mobile technology (2.5m participants). This will help fight dementia by understanding more about how the brain navigates. 

Amalia Papanikolaou

I am a postdoctoral fellow funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; DFG) and based at the Department of Experimental Psychology. My research focuses on understanding how the brain adjusts to sensory experience.

The nervous system adapts to the environment over a wide range of timescales. This plasticity has been parcelled into distinct categories of study (i.e. adaptation, perceptual learning) each emphasising distinct timescales and phenomenology. My principle aim is to investigate how the visual system adapts to changes in the visual environment at multiple timescales and to understand whether distinct forms of plasticity are mediated by the same or different neuronal mechanisms.

Eleonore Duvelle

Who would we be without our memories? Through learning and memorisation of relevant information, our brain learns to make predictions about the world and take (hopefully) appropriate decisions. Our specific experiences make each one of us unique individuals and orient our daily actions. My general aim as a researcher is to try and understand how declarative memories are stored in neural networks and how they are used to influence complex decisions. In particular, I study "place cells", hippocampal neurons thought to encode spatial memories. Recording the activity of these cells in rats performing complex navigation tasks (for example in our "hexamaze") should help us unravel the mechanisms of navigation in complex space and the processes through which memory influences future decisions. Using in vivo electrophysiology, my work as a post-doctoral researcher aims at better understanding some of the neural mechanisms underlying goal-directed navigation in complex environments. I am particularly interested in hippocampal "place cells" and how these neurons might contribute not only to spatial memory but also to flexible decision-making in rats.

Roddy Grieves

I'm a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Behavioral Neuroscience, University College London. My current experiments involve recording neurons at the single cell level in the rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex while these animals freely explore complex environments. Our experiments seek to determine how the activity of these cells can represent 2D spatial locations and how these representations may extend into three dimensions.

Mai Morimoto

Saleem Lab

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